What Do You Call This Breakfast Staple?

My older brother and I grew up on these. I think we were introduced to it for the first time at YMCA camp. That’s where I learned the name of it, too. There’s a brunch spot here in Greenpoint called Enid’s where you can get one of these. Enid’s refers to it in the same way that I do. But I have learned over the years that there are several names used to describe dippy-egg-filled holey bread. What’s yours?

P.S. If you haven’t ever had one of these, you must do so immediately.

41 Comments

  1. Egg in a basket??

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  2. I only call them delicious. You’ve inspired my Saturday morning breakfast!

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  3. Wow! I haven’t had one of those in ages! Now I am hungry. I swear we called them a toad in the hole but that sounds so weird that I am not sure.

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  4. Well, since you’re married to my older brother, I can tell you that you’re correct. :] That’s what we call them, too.

    I have heard so many names over the years, tho. And I’m curious to hear more. Some of them are super funny.

    Julie, I had heard of that one before! Totally forgot about it!

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  5. I’ll have to quiz Rob and see if he remembers. Our children who do not sleep have killed a lot of his brain cells:)

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  6. Eggs in a Basket is what we always called them. Isn’t Toad in a Hole something sausage-y?

    Also YUM.

    (btw, egg in Wburg has an awesome version of this they call Eggs Rothko. if any of you guys have not tried it there, RUN, don’t walk. seriously. and get a side of hash browns. darn it, I’m hungry now.)

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  7. No idea what they’re called – just know we used to so them on the BBQ. DELICIOUS!!!

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  8. I have heard them called “toad in the hole” but also “bullseye”

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  9. toad in the hole! toad in the hole! yay!

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  10. How amazing that you posted about one of the biggest areas of contention in my marriage:

    me: “eggs in a nest” (kind of blah, now that i think about it)

    husband: “toad in a hole”! i thought he was the only one!

    friend: “pterodactyl mountain egg surprise” (no kidding)

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  11. “oops i dropped the toast.”

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  12. My mom used to make those for us all the time!! We used to call them ‘egg in a nest’ though.

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  13. Anyone use the bore? I use it for the excess dippy bits. Although, here, it kind of looks like sausage. heh

    Alright, here’s the bigger question: if you refer to them as a “Toad in the Hole” where did you grow up? I am starting to wonder if this is a pop vs. cola vs soda situation. I grew up in Pennsyltuckey. That’s where I first heard “Toad in the Hole”. I am not sure what they were called down south (lived in Raliegh for 6 years) because I don’t think we ever really ate them during that time period.

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  14. I’ve never had this, although I have heard of it. Looks good! Recipe, please?

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  15. It’s so easy! I think that’s why we had them at camp; easy enough to do it over a campfire. :]

    You take two pieces of bread (or one if you’re not a pig like me). Cut a hole through each one. I put butter on a skillet, get it all hot and whatnot. Let it get melty. I put the two slices of bread in first. I let them get wet with butter.

    Take two eggs, break ‘em right into the center like you would any dippy type egg. The toast will stop the egg from bleeding under or over. It’s awesome.

    Some folks like sunny side up and don’t flip the lovely piece of food art. I do not like my white to be runny so I flip it over at least once. That way, my yellow stays runny and my white gets cooked. :]

    You can break the yolk as well, creating a a harder version of it. In fact, sometimes I’ll do that and add some cheddar cheese to the mix.

    I’m hungry again.

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  16. We always called it “toast in the hole.” I’m sure that was me getting it wrong as a kid. It kind of makes sense, but it’s opposite of what it actually is. My Mom is from North Dakota and my Dad is from Texas. I think the name came from my Mom, though.

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  17. We call the toad in a hole. I noticed you refer to the sunny side up eggs as “dippy eggs”. That is what I used to call sunny side up eggs as a kid. I live in PA for quite some time as you know. My parents are from PA too.
    As far as the pop/soda debate: I call it soda. My relatives from Pittsburgh call it pop. But if you live in the South no matter what brand of soda/pop you have it is called a Coke!

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  18. I call all runny yellow eggs “Dippy”. If they’re hard, they’re over hard. Although, I don’t order them as “I’ll have dippy eggs” when I’m out. Because they would probably kick my ass. I usually say “Over medium” to avoid runny whites.

    Ah, egg culture…

    PA REPRAZENT!

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  19. Oh yeah me too! If I am out I don’t say the “dippy” eggs either….
    So, I wonder is this just a PA thing or do others refer to eggs the same way?

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  20. Okay, I’ve never seen or heard of this! No surprise since I can’t eat eggs…but I googled “Toad in the hole” and got a wikipedia entry as follows:

    Toad in the Hole is a traditional British dish comprising sausages in yorkshire pudding batter, usually served with vegetables and gravy.

    Funny enough, there is also a See Also:
    Egg in the Basket, an unrelated dish with many people also call “Toad in the Hole”. And then they go on to give the recipe for this dish.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Toad_in_the_hole

    I’m not sure how to make that a link, or if I need to.

    I have never heard anyone calling eggs dippy or over hard? Our family just calls them runny or cooked!

    And the soda/pop issue? I am not sure I have heard anyone calling it soda up here in the great white north. ;p It’s always been pop to me, or the name of the flavour (eg. Ginger Ale, Root Beer, Pepsi).

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  21. I have a feeling I’ll be mocked, but we called them pop-eyes.

    Just did.

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  22. Pop-eyes!!! I love it!

    i call it soda. Unless I want something specific, then it’s “Coke” or “Diet Coke”

    The British don’t have any idea what they’re talking about. Plus, anyone that ate that version of Toad in the Hole has most certainly died of a heart attack.

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  23. Thanks for the recipe! I’m definitely gonna try these. I’m from PA, too and have never had these, but I’m mostly from down state.

    Also, I say soda. We lived very briefly upstate where everyone said Pop. And I’ve never heard of “dippy eggs” although I like it!

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  24. I’m from canada as well and would NEVER say soda. It is pop.

    However, my British and Ozzie friends think I’m a loon because what I call 7up or sprite they call lemon ade, what i call lemonade they call lemon juice, what I call lemon juice they call call lemon concentrate.

    So at my house I have to clarify everything when we have a guest.

    Runny eggs at my house are dipping eggs.

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  25. From PA – I have fond childhood memories of screaming my head off for dippy eggs. I thought it was a family term. must be PA.

    Grew up in northwestern PA saying pop. Moved to central PA – got laughed at until I switched to soda.

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  26. They laughed the pop out of you. Awwww

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  27. Eggs in a Basket. Yum.

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  28. eggs in a basket. yo.

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  29. My mom called them Birds In Its Nest (Albany NY)

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  30. Yep. Toad in a hole here too. (Australia that is)

    and over here we say Soft Drink.

    k.

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  31. spit in the eye!

    that’s what my family called them growing up! i love the egg REALLY runny!

    yum yum yum!

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  32. i usually make an extra piece w/ just holes to dip into the egg.
    i’m such a carb addict.

    i wonder if i can convince my husband to go get some eggs.

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  33. My mom always called them “Hollywood Eggs” (?) Apparently, her brother saw someone make them in a movie in the ‘50s and I guess just associated them with LaLaLand.

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  34. I’ve never had that, but they look divine. Thanks for telling me how to make them. I only saw them once before in the move “V for Vendetta”. For the life of me I can’t remember what they were called in that movie but I thought she named them.

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  35. One eyed Jacks. mmmmmm.

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  36. My friend Janet made me one last time I was in SF. She calls them Cowboy Buttholes.

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  37. That’s the BEST name so far! Bravo, Janet! Bravo!

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  38. Growing up, I had a children’s cook book with this recipe, and I made these quite often. The book called them One-Eyed Jacks, and you just used a glass to cut the hole in the bread. Delicious.

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  39. yeah, jeff calls them one-eyed jacks too. i, sadly, have never had this before. he said the ones in your picture are missing cheese on top. blasphemy!

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